Coronavirus Live Updates: Quarantine Ordered as Cases Are Linked to Shopping Center

The World Health Organization said it had chosen a name for the disease that makes no reference to places, animals or people to avoid stigmatizing anyone. Nearly a third of the confirmed cases of the virus in the Chinese city of Tianjin were linked to a single mall. The World Health Organization on Monday proposed an official name for the illness caused by new coronavirus: COVID-19. The director general of the World Health Organization, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, noted that the new name makes no reference to any of the people, places or animals associated with the coronavirus. The goal was to avoid stigma. Under international guidelines, the W.H.O. “had to find a name that did not refer to a geographical location, an animal, an individual or group of people, and which is also pronounceable and related to the disease,” he said on Twitter. The death toll from the coronavirus epidemic is continuing to climb, Chinese officials said on Tuesday. By the end of Monday, the government said, 1,016 people had died from the coronavirus — an increase of 108 from the previous day. Most of the deaths occurred in Hubei Province. The number of confirmed infections in China also grew, to at lea...

In a story May 20 about travel spending at the World Health Organization, The Associated Press

In a story May 20 about travel spending at the World Health Organization, The Associated Press reported erroneously that information about the organization’s travel spending was obtained from internal documents. The information was made publicly available on WHO’s website on May 9. The UN health agency spent nearly $192 million on travel last year, with some staffers breaking its own rules by traveling in business class when not warranted LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization spent nearly $192 million on travel expenses last year, with staffers sometimes breaking the agency’s own rules by traveling in business class, booking expensive last-minute tickets and traveling without the required approvals, according to documents recently published by WHO on its website . The abuses could spook potential donors and partners as the organization begins its week-long annual meeting Monday in Geneva, seeking increased support to fight a devastating outbreak of Ebola in Congo and other deadly diseases including polio, malaria and measles. The nearly $192 million is down 4% from 2017, when the agency pledged to rein in travel abuses following an AP investigation. WHO a...